Insect Love: Japanese beetles

Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica, Scarabaeidae) fumbling towards ecstasy. Photographed 07/13/2010 near Clayton Michigan.

Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica, Scarabaeidae) emerge in June and begin feeding on a wide variety of plants, skeletonizing the leaves.  They’re well-known pests of many garden and agricultural plants.

Upon emergence they release a pheromone to attract others to their location, presumably to increase mating opportunities.  Females specifically release a sex pheromone to attract males.  After mating, females lay their eggs several inches below the surface of the ground.  Larvae either emerge and feed or burrow deeper to avoid the winter, depending on the time of year.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Entomology, Insect Love and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Insect Love: Japanese beetles

  1. Pingback: Random Insect: Scarab beetle, possibly an earth-boring dung beetle | The Life of Your Time

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