Plant-Insect Interaction: Sweat bee on stinking chamomile

Sweat bee (family Halictidae, possibly of the genus Augochlorella) on a stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula, Asteraceae) . Photographed 05/29/2011 near Blissfield Michigan.

Sweat bees (family Halictidae) earn their name from the affinity for human perspiration that’s exhibited by some members of the genus Lasioglossum (Triplehorn and Johnson 2005).  It may be more accurate to call sweat bees halictids since many species lack this attraction to sweat.

Human sweat aside, members of this family spend their days digging nests in the ground, feeding on nectar, and collecting pollen for their young.  Pollen and nectar are collected from a variety of flowers, including this common stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula, Asteraceae) .

Sweat bee (family Halictidae, possibly of the genus Augochlorella) on a stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula, Asteraceae) . Photographed 05/29/2011 near Blissfield Michigan.

Based on the pointed apex of the marginal cell, pale green color, and reddish tegulae, this halictid appears to be a member of the genus Augochlorella.  As the literature suggests, it didn’t seem remotely interested in my sweat.

Literature cited:

Triplehorn, C.A. and N.F. Johnson.  2005.  Borror and DeLong’s Introduction to the Study of Insects.  Seventh Edition.  Thomson Brooks/Cole, Belmont, CA.

Advertisements

About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Ecology, Entomology, Organism Interactions and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s