Random Insect: Eight-spotted forester moth

Eight-spotted forester moth (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Alypia octomaculata) feeding on a mullein foxglove (Dasistoma macrophylla, Scrophulariaceae).  Photographed 07/08/2012 at Side Cut Metropark near Maumee, Ohio.

Last week I found this eight-spotted forester moth (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Alypia octomaculata) feeding on a variety of flowers at Side Cut Metropark near Maumee, Ohio. First it was visiting a mullein foxglove (Dasistoma macrophylla, Scrophulariaceae), then it moved over to a wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa, Lamiaceae) before sampling some other plants. While adults feed on nectar from a variety of flowers, the larvae feed on the leaves of vines like grape and Virginia creeper.

Eight-spotted forester moth (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Alypia octomaculata) on a wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa, Lamiaceae).  Photographed 07/08/2012 at Side Cut Metropark near Maumee, Ohio.

Eight-spotted foresters are uncommon among moths in that adults fly and feed during the day. Most moths are nocturnal, but this individual was fluttering about several hours after dawn broke. Because they’re diurnal, they’re sometimes mistaken for butterflies.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Ecology, Entomology, Random Insect and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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