Random Insect: Treehopper

Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Entylia sp.) photographed 09/23/2012 at Pinckney State Recreation Area, Michigan.

Treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae) are often easy to recognize thanks to their large pronota. In this family the upper surface of the first thoracic segment is expanded, covering the head and most of the abdomen. In many species the pronotum can take on a variety of ornate shapes. Some merely look humpbacked, but others are shaped like thorns, horns, spines, or in the case of this individual (Entylia sp.), the keel of a boat.

Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Entylia sp.) photographed 09/23/2012 at Pinckney State Recreation Area, Michigan.

A couple of weeks ago I found several of these crawling around on goldenrod (Solidago spp., Asteraceae) and other asters at Pinckney State Recreation Area near Chelsea, Michigan. Although treehoppers feed on plants, only a few are of any economic importance as pests.

Advertisements

About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Entomology, Random Insect and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s