Random Plant: Morrow’s honeysuckle

Morrow’s honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii, Caprifoliaceae) photographed 08/18/2012 at Pinckney State Recreation Area near Chelsea, Michigan.

Morrow’s honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii, Caprifoliaceae) is one of several Asian bush honeysuckles that were imported to the United States long ago. It has much in common with Amur honeysuckle, which I wrote about the other day. Both were introduced for use as ornamentals and in wildlife habitats and hedgerows. Both are large woody shrubs or small trees featuring opposite, simple leaves, paired small round fruit, and hollow stem centers. Most importantly, both are highly invasive and detrimental to native ecosystems. Like other Asian bush honeysuckles, Morrow’s honeysuckle outcompetes and displaces native plants, reducing biodiversity and disrupting food webs.

Morrow’s honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii, Caprifoliaceae) photographed 08/18/2012 at Pinckney State Recreation Area near Chelsea, Michigan.

Unlike the red fruit of Amur honeysuckle, Morrow’s honeysuckle can have fruit that are red, orange, or both. This species is further distinguished by the oval, blunt-tipped leaves with tomentose (fuzzy) undersides and stems.

Morrow’s honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii, Caprifoliaceae) photographed 08/18/2012 at Pinckney State Recreation Area near Chelsea, Michigan.

As with all invasive Asian bush honeysuckles, intentional cultivation is highly discouraged. The only approach that is recommended is killing these plants by pulling, burning, or using herbicides.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Random Plant and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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