Random Insect: Snout beetle spreading its wings

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Snout beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) photographed 05/04/2013 near Blissfield, Michigan.

As one of the largest animal families, snout and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are represented by over 40,000 species throughout the world. Within North America there are over 2,500 species, making these some of the more difficult insects to identify specifically.

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Snout beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) photographed 05/04/2013 near Blissfield, Michigan.

Also known as weevils, these beetles usually feature long, downward-curving rostrums (“noses”) and elbowed antennae. Most feed on plants as both larvae and adults, and many are economically important crop pests.

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Snout beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) photographed 05/04/2013 near Blissfield, Michigan.

As with other beetles, these insects bear two pairs of wings. The first pair is thickened and hardened, forming what are known as elytra. These specialized wings protect the rear flight wings. Last week I managed to capture this snout beetle in the split second it took to open its wings and take off.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Entomology, Random Insect and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Random Insect: Snout beetle spreading its wings

  1. Jim says:

    I really think these little weevils are cool. They seem to spend all there time alone. I wonder what a typical day for them would be?

    Like

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