Random Insect: Common sawfly hiding in a sedge

DSCF1136

Common sawfly (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) on a sedge (Carex sp., Cyperaceae). Photographed 05/12/2013 near Blissfield, Michigan.

While out in a southeast Michigan floodplain forest this afternoon I came across this common sawfly (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) hiding in clump of sedge leaves (Carex sp., Cyperaceae). The larvae of these wasp-like insects eat plant material and many species are host-specific, feeding only on particular plants. While some species are economically important pests of cultivated plants, the majority have relatively harmless relationships with their hosts. My first thought was that this sedge may be a host plant for this sawfly species. The sawfly may have been hanging out waiting for a mate, with the female subsequently laying her eggs on the sedge.

sawfly

Common sawfly (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) on a sedge (Carex sp., Cyperaceae). Photographed 05/12/2013 near Blissfield, Michigan.

On the other hand the sawfly may have simply found the sedge to be a comfortable place to hide from the impending cold. Although the weather has been perfect here for a while, tonight we’re dipping below freezing for the first time in weeks. With the high today only in the 40s F, it seemed as if most insects would be seeking shelter for the night.

Advertisements

About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Ecology, Entomology, Random Insect and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s