Random Plant: Big devils beggartick

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Big devils beggartick (Bidens vulgata, Asteraceae) photographed 09/11/2013 near Clayton, Michigan.

Big devils beggartick (Bidens vulgata, Asteraceae) is a native of wetlands from the northern plains through the northeast. It’s most commonly found in marshes, floodplains, moist meadows, damp open woodlands, along drainage ditches, and in disturbed areas with sufficient sunlight and moisture.

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Big devils beggartick (Bidens vulgata, Asteraceae) photographed 09/11/2013 near Clayton, Michigan.

Most asters bear large ray florets, prominent bright petals that radiate outward from the smaller disc florets. This species instead features a ring of leafy bracts around the disc florets, making the flower heads much less showy.

The compound leaves are coarsely serrated and can appear in groups of three or five:

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Big devils beggartick (Bidens vulgata, Asteraceae) photographed 09/11/2013 near Clayton, Michigan.

Several other species of beggartick look similar, but big devils beggartick can be distinguished by its relatively large flower heads, arrangement of 12-20 bracts, and 3- or 5-part compound leaves. Other beggarticks have smaller flower heads, fewer bracts, or simple leaves, and a few bear bright yellow ray florets like other asters.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Random Plant and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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