Random Plant: Wild blue phlox

wildbluephlox

Wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata, Polemoniaceae) photographed 05/02/2014 at Zaleski State Forest near Athens, Ohio.

Wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata, Polemoniaceae) can often be seen flowering in the spring in the woodlands of eastern North America. From March through May these spring ephemerals take advantage of abundant early season sunshine, growing and completing reproduction before most trees have fully leafed out. By the time canopy trees have blanketed the forest floor in shade these plants have already gone to seed.

wildbluephlox2

Wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata, Polemoniaceae) photographed 05/02/2014 at Zaleski State Forest near Athens, Ohio.

These perennials have stems and leaves that are covered in hairs and are usually sticky to the touch. Flowers feature five notched petals that can appear blue, white, red, pink, or purple, but lavender is most common. Plants are pollinated primarily by bumble bees, bee flies, butterflies, and moths, who use their long “tongues” to sip nectar from deep within the flowers. Although pollination and reproduction result in seeds, wild blue phlox also spreads by rhizomes.

Advertisements

About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, Random Plant and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s