Random Plant: Pale evening primrose

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Pale evening primrose (Oenothera pallida, Onagraceae) photographed 04/15/2014 at Arches National Park, Utah.

Pale evening primrose (Oenothera pallida, Onagraceae) is an eye-catching native of the North American west. Found growing in arid regions from British Columbia through Texas, it’s often seen in desert shrublands and pinyon-juniper woodlands.

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Pale evening primrose (Oenothera pallida, Onagraceae) photographed 04/15/2014 at Arches National Park, Utah.

This primrose features thick reddish stems and long, narrow leaves with wrinkled edges. The large, showy flowers can appear all the way from mid-spring through mid-autumn. The four wide, white petals are tinged with yellow near their bases where they give rise to eight long stamens. Pollination is performed by certain moths and bees, and this plant is an important food source for many native bees in particular. After pollination the petals turn pink and the flower develops into a seed-bearing four-chambered capsule.

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About Jeremy Sell

Science and nature nerd.
This entry was posted in Botany, National Parks, Random Plant and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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